..

A-Paper

(Thomson Reuters JIF≥1 v WKWI≥A v VHB≥A v GI-CSCW≥A)

2021


  • Jasche, F., Hoffmann, S., Ludwig, T. & Wulf, V. (2021)Comparison of Different Types of Augmented Reality Visualizations for Instructions.

    Yokohama, Japan, Publisher: ACM, New York, NY, USA, Pages: 1–13 doi:10.1145/3411764.3445724
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @inproceedings{jasche_comparison_2021,
    address = {Yokohama, Japan},
    title = {Comparison of {Different} {Types} of {Augmented} {Reality} {Visualizations} for {Instructions}.},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411764.3445724},
    doi = {10.1145/3411764.3445724},
    booktitle = {{CHI} '21: {Proceedings} of the 2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {ACM, New York, NY, USA},
    author = {Jasche, Florian and Hoffmann, Sven and Ludwig, Thomas and Wulf, Volker},
    month = may,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {a-paper},
    pages = {1--13},
    }


  • Weber, P., Ludwig, T., Brodessen, S. & Grönewald, L. (2021)“It’s a kind of art!”: Understanding Food Influencers as Influential Content Creators

    Yokohama, Japan, Publisher: ACM, New York, NY, USA, Pages: 1–14 doi:10.1145/3411764.3445607
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @inproceedings{weber_its_2021,
    address = {Yokohama, Japan},
    title = {"{It}'s a kind of art!": {Understanding} {Food} {Influencers} as {Influential} {Content} {Creators}},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411764.3445607},
    doi = {10.1145/3411764.3445607},
    booktitle = {{CHI} '21: {The} {ACM} {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {ACM, New York, NY, USA},
    author = {Weber, Philip and Ludwig, Thomas and Brodessen, Sabrina and Grönewald, Laura},
    month = may,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {rendezfood, a-paper},
    pages = {1--14},
    }

2018


  • Reuter, C., Ludwig, T. & Mischur, P. (2018)RescueGlass: Collaborative Applications involving Head-Mounted Displays for Red Cross Rescue Dog Units

    IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Pages: 1–38 doi:10.1007/s10606-018-9339-8
    [BibTeX]

    @article{reuter_rescueglass_2018,
    title = {{RescueGlass}: {Collaborative} {Applications} involving {Head}-{Mounted} {Displays} for {Red} {Cross} {Rescue} {Dog} {Units}},
    doi = {10.1007/s10606-018-9339-8},
    journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
    author = {Reuter, Christian and Ludwig, Thomas and Mischur, Patrick},
    year = {2018},
    keywords = {HCI, A-Paper, KontiKat, Infrastruktur, KOKOS, Kooperation},
    pages = {1--38},
    }

2017


  • Ludwig, T., Hansson, K., Aitamurto, T. & Gupta, N. (2017)Special Issue on Crowd Dynamics: Conflicts, Contradictions, and Cooperation Issues in Crowdsourcing

    IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Vol. accepted
    [BibTeX]

    @article{ludwig_special_2017,
    title = {Special {Issue} on {Crowd} {Dynamics}: {Conflicts}, {Contradictions}, and {Cooperation} {Issues} in {Crowdsourcing}},
    volume = {accepted},
    journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Hansson, Karin and Aitamurto, Tanja and Gupta, Neha},
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {CSCW, A-Paper},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Kotthaus, C., Reuter, C., van Dongen, S., Pipek, V., Dongen, S. V. & Pipek, V. (2017)Situated crowdsourcing during disasters: Managing the tasks of spontaneous volunteers through public displays

    IN International Journal on Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS), Vol. 102, Pages: 103–121 doi:10.1016/j.ijhcs.2016.09.008
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Abstract Although emergency services have already recognized the importance of citizen-initiated activities during disasters, still questions with regard to the coordination of spontaneous volunteers and their activities arise. Within our article, we will present a technological approach based on public displays which aims to foster situated crowdsourcing between affected citizens, spontaneous volunteers as well as official emergency services. We will address the research question: How can the situated tasks performed by spontaneous volunteers be supported by the use of public displays during disasters? First we will present the current state of the art with regard to the coordination practices of spontaneous volunteers and emergency services within disaster situations as well as related problems, potentials and specifics of situated crowdsourcing and public displays. To gain insight into actual coordination practices, we conducted an empirical study with 18 different stakeholders involved in disaster management. Based on the literature review and our empirical study, we have derived a technical concept that supports the task and activity management of spontaneous volunteers as well as the coordination both of the demands of affected people and the offers from spontaneous volunteers. We have implemented our concept as the public display application ‘City-Share’, which provides a robust communication infrastructure and encompasses situated crowdsourcing mechanisms for managing offers and demands of activities on-the-ground. Based on its evaluation with several users, we will discuss our findings with regard to the assignment of tasks on-the-ground and situated crowdsourcing during emergencies. We outline that City-Share can improve a community’s disaster resilience, especially when focusing on the kind of collaborative resilience emerging between official stakeholders and spontaneous volunteers or affected citizens at a local level.

    @article{ludwig_situated_2017,
    title = {Situated crowdsourcing during disasters: {Managing} the tasks of spontaneous volunteers through public displays},
    volume = {102},
    url = {http://wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2016/2016_Ludwigetal_SituatedCrowdsourcingPublicDisplay_IJHCS.pdf http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1071581916301197},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ijhcs.2016.09.008},
    abstract = {Abstract Although emergency services have already recognized the importance of citizen-initiated activities during disasters, still questions with regard to the coordination of spontaneous volunteers and their activities arise. Within our article, we will present a technological approach based on public displays which aims to foster situated crowdsourcing between affected citizens, spontaneous volunteers as well as official emergency services. We will address the research question: How can the situated tasks performed by spontaneous volunteers be supported by the use of public displays during disasters? First we will present the current state of the art with regard to the coordination practices of spontaneous volunteers and emergency services within disaster situations as well as related problems, potentials and specifics of situated crowdsourcing and public displays. To gain insight into actual coordination practices, we conducted an empirical study with 18 different stakeholders involved in disaster management. Based on the literature review and our empirical study, we have derived a technical concept that supports the task and activity management of spontaneous volunteers as well as the coordination both of the demands of affected people and the offers from spontaneous volunteers. We have implemented our concept as the public display application ‘City-Share', which provides a robust communication infrastructure and encompasses situated crowdsourcing mechanisms for managing offers and demands of activities on-the-ground. Based on its evaluation with several users, we will discuss our findings with regard to the assignment of tasks on-the-ground and situated crowdsourcing during emergencies. We outline that City-Share can improve a community's disaster resilience, especially when focusing on the kind of collaborative resilience emerging between official stakeholders and spontaneous volunteers or affected citizens at a local level.},
    number = {C},
    journal = {International Journal on Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS)},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Kotthaus, Christoph and Reuter, Christian and van Dongen, Sören and Pipek, Volkmar and Dongen, Sören Van and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, KOKOS, Kooperation, Crisis management, Design case study, Disasters, Situated crowdsourcing, Spontaneous volunteers},
    pages = {103--121},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Boden, A. & Pipek, V. (2017)3D Printers as Sociable Technologies: Taking Appropriation Infrastructures to the Internet of Things

    IN ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), Vol. 24
    [BibTeX]

    @article{ludwig_3d_2017,
    title = {{3D} {Printers} as {Sociable} {Technologies}: {Taking} {Appropriation} {Infrastructures} to the {Internet} of {Things}},
    volume = {24},
    number = {2},
    journal = {ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI)},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Boden, Alexander and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {CSCW, A-Paper},
    }

2016


  • Hansson, K., Muller, M., Aitamurto, T., Irani, L., Mazarakis, A., Gupta, N. & Ludwig, T. (2016)Crowd Dynamics: Exploring Conflicts and Contradictions in Crowdsourcing

    New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 3604–3611 doi:10.1145/2851581.2856505
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @inproceedings{hansson_crowd_2016,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{CHI} {EA} '16},
    title = {Crowd {Dynamics}: {Exploring} {Conflicts} and {Contradictions} in {Crowdsourcing}},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-4082-3},
    url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2851581.2856505},
    doi = {10.1145/2851581.2856505},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 {CHI} {Conference} {Extended} {Abstracts} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {ACM},
    author = {Hansson, Karin and Muller, Michael and Aitamurto, Tanja and Irani, Lilly and Mazarakis, Athanasios and Gupta, Neha and Ludwig, Thomas},
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {CSCW, citizen science, crowd dynamics, crowdfunding, peer-production, crowd-work, crowdsourcing, a-paper},
    pages = {3604--3611},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Reuter, C. & Pipek, V. (2016)From Publics to Communities: Researching the Path of Shared Issues Through ICT

    IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Vol. 25, Pages: 193–225 doi:10.1007/s10606-016-9252-y
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    In recent years, citizens’ movements such as the Arab Spring or Euromaidan protests have clearly shown that, whenever affected — whether negatively or positively — by the state and government decisions, citizens act to deal with the shared issues. Groups of people who organize themselves to address (mainly political) issues were defined as a `public’ by the philosopher John Dewey. He believed it is necessary to improve communication to create a `Great Community’ as a cohesive group of a public. Although information and communication technologies (ICT) lead to ambivalent effects on pursuing this goal and often distract the mass of people from discussing these issues, we argue that nowadays ICT can improve communication and has the potential to foster the detection of issues and therefore promote the (trans-)formation of a public into an issue-based community. As our foundation we took a literature study covering the formation of publics and their potential to evolve into communities, as well as their interplay with technology. This formed the basis for the development of our operational model that `follows the issues’ for capturing the (trans-)formation of a public. Based on our model, we outline different perspectives on detecting shared issues as early indicators for publics based on ICT and derive implications for researching this process from a practical perspective.

    @article{ludwig_publics_2016,
    title = {From {Publics} to {Communities}: {Researching} the {Path} of {Shared} {Issues} {Through} {ICT}},
    volume = {25},
    issn = {0925-9724},
    url = {http://wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2016/2016_ludwigreuterpipek_frompublicstocommunities_jcscw.pdf http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10606-016-9252-y https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2016/2016_ludwigreuterpipek_frompublicstocommunities_jcscw.pdf},
    doi = {10.1007/s10606-016-9252-y},
    abstract = {In recent years, citizens' movements such as the Arab Spring or Euromaidan protests have clearly shown that, whenever affected — whether negatively or positively — by the state and government decisions, citizens act to deal with the shared issues. Groups of people who organize themselves to address (mainly political) issues were defined as a `public' by the philosopher John Dewey. He believed it is necessary to improve communication to create a `Great Community' as a cohesive group of a public. Although information and communication technologies (ICT) lead to ambivalent effects on pursuing this goal and often distract the mass of people from discussing these issues, we argue that nowadays ICT can improve communication and has the potential to foster the detection of issues and therefore promote the (trans-)formation of a public into an issue-based community. As our foundation we took a literature study covering the formation of publics and their potential to evolve into communities, as well as their interplay with technology. This formed the basis for the development of our operational model that `follows the issues' for capturing the (trans-)formation of a public. Based on our model, we outline different perspectives on detecting shared issues as early indicators for publics based on ICT and derive implications for researching this process from a practical perspective.},
    number = {2-3},
    journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Reuter, Christian and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, A-Paper, EmerGent, SMO, Kooperation, Communities, Infrastructures, Mobile devices, Publics, Social media},
    pages = {193--225},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Dax, J., Pipek, V. & Randall, D. (2016)Work or Leisure? Designing a User-Centered Approach for Researching Activity ‘in the Wild’

    IN Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing (PUC), Springer
    [BibTeX]

    @article{ludwig_work_2016,
    title = {Work or {Leisure}? {Designing} a {User}-{Centered} {Approach} for {Researching} {Activity} ‘in the {Wild}'},
    journal = {Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing (PUC), Springer},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Dax, Julian and Pipek, Volkmar and Randall, David},
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {CSCW, A-Paper, MdK},
    }


  • Reuter, C., Ludwig, T., Kaufhold, M. & Spielhofer, T. (2016)Emergency Services’ Attitudes towards Social Media: A Quantitative and Qualitative Survey across Europe

    IN International Journal on Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS), Vol. 95, Pages: 96–111 doi:10.1016/j.ijhcs.2016.03.005
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Various studies show that social media is used in emergencies – and that in spite of possible challenges for emergency services, beneficial use cases can be identified. However, relatively little empirical data is available regarding the attitudes of emergency services towards social media, and almost none of a comparative nature. This article summarizes the findings of a survey conducted of the EU project ‘EmerGent’ with 761 emergency service staff across 32 European countries from September to December 2014. The main aims of the survey were to explore the attitudes expressed by emergency service staff towards social media for private and organizational use as well as the levels and main factors influencing the current and likely future use of social media in their organizations. Based on our results, we discuss possible enhancements of the emergency management cycle using social media.

    @article{reuter_emergency_2016,
    title = {Emergency {Services}' {Attitudes} towards {Social} {Media}: {A} {Quantitative} and {Qualitative} {Survey} across {Europe}},
    volume = {95},
    url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2016/2016_reuteretal_emergencyservicesattiudessurveysocialmedia_ijhcs.pdf http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1071581916000379 http://wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2016/2016_reuteretal_emergencyservicesatt},
    doi = {10.1016/j.ijhcs.2016.03.005},
    abstract = {Various studies show that social media is used in emergencies – and that in spite of possible challenges for emergency services, beneficial use cases can be identified. However, relatively little empirical data is available regarding the attitudes of emergency services towards social media, and almost none of a comparative nature. This article summarizes the findings of a survey conducted of the EU project ‘EmerGent' with 761 emergency service staff across 32 European countries from September to December 2014. The main aims of the survey were to explore the attitudes expressed by emergency service staff towards social media for private and organizational use as well as the levels and main factors influencing the current and likely future use of social media in their organizations. Based on our results, we discuss possible enhancements of the emergency management cycle using social media.},
    journal = {International Journal on Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS)},
    author = {Reuter, Christian and Ludwig, Thomas and Kaufhold, Marc-André and Spielhofer, Thomas},
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, A-Paper, EmerGent, Selected, SMO},
    pages = {96--111},
    }

2015


  • Reuter, C., Ludwig, T., Kaufhold, M. & Pipek, V. (2015)XHELP: Design of a Cross-Platform Social-Media Application to Support Volunteer Moderators in Disasters

    Seoul, Korea, Publisher: ACM Press, Pages: 4093–4102 doi:10.1145/2702123.2702171
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Recent disasters have shown an increase in the significance of social media for both affected citizens and volunteers alike in the coordination of information and organization of relief activities, often independently of and in addition to the official emergency response. Existing research mainly focuses on the way in which individual platforms are used by volunteers in response to disasters. This paper examines the use of social media during the European Floods of 2013 and proposes a novel cross-social-media application for volunteers. Besides comprehensive analysis of volunteer communities, interviews were conducted with “digital volunteers” such as Facebook moderators of disaster-related groups. Based on the challenges identified, we designed and implemented the cross-social-media application “XHELP”, which allows information to be both, acquired and distributed cross-media and cross-channel. The evaluation with 20 users leads to further design requirements for applications aiming to support volunteer moderators during disasters.

    @inproceedings{reuter_xhelp_2015,
    address = {Seoul, Korea},
    title = {{XHELP}: {Design} of a {Cross}-{Platform} {Social}-{Media} {Application} to {Support} {Volunteer} {Moderators} in {Disasters}},
    url = {http://www.peasec.de/paper/2015/2015_ReuterLudwigKaufholdPipek_XHELP_CHI.pdf https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2015/2015_reuterludwigkaufholdpipek_xhelp_chi.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJjonJRa3Lg http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2702171},
    doi = {10.1145/2702123.2702171},
    abstract = {Recent disasters have shown an increase in the significance of social media for both affected citizens and volunteers alike in the coordination of information and organization of relief activities, often independently of and in addition to the official emergency response. Existing research mainly focuses on the way in which individual platforms are used by volunteers in response to disasters. This paper examines the use of social media during the European Floods of 2013 and proposes a novel cross-social-media application for volunteers. Besides comprehensive analysis of volunteer communities, interviews were conducted with "digital volunteers" such as Facebook moderators of disaster-related groups. Based on the challenges identified, we designed and implemented the cross-social-media application "XHELP", which allows information to be both, acquired and distributed cross-media and cross-channel. The evaluation with 20 users leads to further design requirements for applications aiming to support volunteer moderators during disasters.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems} ({CHI})},
    publisher = {ACM Press},
    author = {Reuter, Christian and Ludwig, Thomas and Kaufhold, Marc-André and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, A-Paper, EmerGent, Selected, SMO, Kooperation},
    pages = {4093--4102},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Reuter, C., Siebigteroth, T. & Pipek, V. (2015)CrowdMonitor: Mobile Crowd Sensing for Assessing Physical and Digital Activities of Citizens during Emergencies

    IN Begole, B., Jinwoo, K., Kor, I. & Woontack, W. (Eds.). New York, USA, Publisher: ACM Press, Pages: 4083–4092
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Emergencies such as the 2013 Central European flood or the 2013 typhoon Haiyan in Philippines have shown how citizens can organize themselves and coordinate private relief activities. These activities can be found in (physical) groups of affected people, but also within (digital) social media communities. There is an evident need, however, for a clearer picture of what exactly is going on to be available for use by the official emergency services: to enlist them, to keep them safe, to support their efforts and to avoid need-less duplications or conflicts. Aligning emergency services and volunteer activities is, then, crucial. In this paper we present a mobile crowd sensing based concept, which was designed as well as implemented as the application CrowdMonitor and facilitates the detection of physical and digital activities and the assignment of specific tasks to citizens. Finally, we outline the findings of its evaluation.

    @inproceedings{ludwig_crowdmonitor_2015,
    address = {New York, USA},
    title = {{CrowdMonitor}: {Mobile} {Crowd} {Sensing} for {Assessing} {Physical} and {Digital} {Activities} of {Citizens} during {Emergencies}},
    url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2015/2015_ludwigreutersiebigterothpipek_crowdmonitor_chi.pdf},
    abstract = {Emergencies such as the 2013 Central European flood or the 2013 typhoon Haiyan in Philippines have shown how citizens can organize themselves and coordinate private relief activities. These activities can be found in (physical) groups of affected people, but also within (digital) social media communities. There is an evident need, however, for a clearer picture of what exactly is going on to be available for use by the official emergency services: to enlist them, to keep them safe, to support their efforts and to avoid need-less duplications or conflicts. Aligning emergency services and volunteer activities is, then, crucial. In this paper we present a mobile crowd sensing based concept, which was designed as well as implemented as the application CrowdMonitor and facilitates the detection of physical and digital activities and the assignment of specific tasks to citizens. Finally, we outline the findings of its evaluation.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the {International} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems} ({CHI})},
    publisher = {ACM Press},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Reuter, Christian and Siebigteroth, Tim and Pipek, Volkmar},
    editor = {Begole, Bo and Jinwoo, Kim and Kor, Inkpeni and Woontack, Woo},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, EmerGent, Kooperation},
    pages = {4083--4092},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Reuter, C. & Pipek, V. (2015)Social Haystack: Dynamic Quality Assessment of Citizen-Generated Content in Social Media during Emergencies

    IN ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ToCHI), Vol. 21, Pages: Article 17 doi:10.1145/2749461
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    People all over the world are regularly affected by disasters and emergencies. Besides official emergency services, ordinary citizens are getting increasingly involved in crisis response work. They are usually present on-site at the place of incident and use social media to share information about the event. For emergency services, the large amount of citizen-generated content in social media, however, means that finding high-quality information is similar to “finding a needle in a haystack”. This article presents an approach to how a dynamic and subjective quality assessment of citizen-generated content could support the work of emergency services. First, we present results of our empirical study concerning the usage of citizen-generated content by emergency services. Based on our literature review and empirical study, we derive design guidelines and describe a concept for dynamic quality measurement that is implemented as a service-oriented web-application “Social Haystack.” Finally, we outline findings of its evaluation and implications thereof.

    @article{ludwig_social_2015,
    title = {Social {Haystack}: {Dynamic} {Quality} {Assessment} of {Citizen}-{Generated} {Content} in {Social} {Media} during {Emergencies}},
    volume = {21},
    url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2798442.2749461 https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2015/2015_ludwigreuterpipek_socialhaystack_tochi.pdf},
    doi = {10.1145/2749461},
    abstract = {People all over the world are regularly affected by disasters and emergencies. Besides official emergency services, ordinary citizens are getting increasingly involved in crisis response work. They are usually present on-site at the place of incident and use social media to share information about the event. For emergency services, the large amount of citizen-generated content in social media, however, means that finding high-quality information is similar to “finding a needle in a haystack”. This article presents an approach to how a dynamic and subjective quality assessment of citizen-generated content could support the work of emergency services. First, we present results of our empirical study concerning the usage of citizen-generated content by emergency services. Based on our literature review and empirical study, we derive design guidelines and describe a concept for dynamic quality measurement that is implemented as a service-oriented web-application “Social Haystack.” Finally, we outline findings of its evaluation and implications thereof.},
    number = {4},
    journal = {ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ToCHI)},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Reuter, Christian and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, EmerGent, SMO, MdK},
    pages = {Article 17},
    }


  • Ludwig, T., Reuter, C. & Pipek, V. (2015)Social Haystack: Dynamic Quality Assessment of Citizen-Generated Content in Social Media during Emergencies

    IN ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, Vol. 22, Pages: 17:1–17:27
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @article{ludwig_social_2015-1,
    title = {Social {Haystack}: {Dynamic} {Quality} {Assessment} of {Citizen}-{Generated} {Content} in {Social} {Media} during {Emergencies}},
    volume = {22},
    url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2015/2015_ludwigreuterpipek_socialhaystack_tochi.pdf},
    number = {4},
    journal = {ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Reuter, Christian and Pipek, Volkmar},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {CSCW, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, EmerGent, MdK},
    pages = {17:1--17:27},
    }

2014


  • Reuter, C., Ludwig, T. & Pipek, V. (2014)Ad Hoc Participation in Situation Assessment: Supporting Mobile Collaboration in Emergencies

    IN ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ToCHI), Vol. 21, Pages: 26:1–26:26 doi:10.1145/2651365
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Emergencies are characterized by high complexity and unpredictability. In order to assess and manage them successfully, improvisation work and informal communication, even beyond local and organizational boundaries, is needed. Such informal practices can facilitate ad hoc participation of units in situation assessment, but this may lack overall situation awareness. This paper presents a study on how emergent ‘collaboration needs’ in current work of response teams, who are located on-site and in the control center, could be supported by mobile geo-collaboration systems. First, we present the results of an empirical study about informal work and mobile collaboration practices of emergency services. Then we describe the concept of a mobile geo-collaboration system that addresses the aspects detected in the empirical study and that was implemented as an Android application using web sockets, a technology enabling full-duplex ad hoc communication. Finally we outline the findings of its evaluation in practice and its implications.

    @article{reuter_ad_2014,
    title = {Ad {Hoc} {Participation} in {Situation} {Assessment}: {Supporting} {Mobile} {Collaboration} in {Emergencies}},
    volume = {21},
    issn = {10730516},
    url = {http://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2014/2014_reuterludwigpipek_adhocparticipation_tochi.pdf},
    doi = {10.1145/2651365},
    abstract = {Emergencies are characterized by high complexity and unpredictability. In order to assess and manage them successfully, improvisation work and informal communication, even beyond local and organizational boundaries, is needed. Such informal practices can facilitate ad hoc participation of units in situation assessment, but this may lack overall situation awareness. This paper presents a study on how emergent ‘collaboration needs' in current work of response teams, who are located on-site and in the control center, could be supported by mobile geo-collaboration systems. First, we present the results of an empirical study about informal work and mobile collaboration practices of emergency services. Then we describe the concept of a mobile geo-collaboration system that addresses the aspects detected in the empirical study and that was implemented as an Android application using web sockets, a technology enabling full-duplex ad hoc communication. Finally we outline the findings of its evaluation in practice and its implications.},
    number = {5},
    journal = {ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ToCHI)},
    author = {Reuter, Christian and Ludwig, Thomas and Pipek, Volkmar},
    month = nov,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {CSCW, emergency management, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, Selected, Kooperation, InfoStrom, MdK, GI-CSCW-A, WKWI-A, participation, awareness, mobile devices, ethnography, collaboration, design case study, IF 1.2, situation assessment},
    pages = {26:1--26:26},
    }


  • Ley, B., Ludwig, T., Pipek, V., Randall, D. D., Reuter, C. & Wiedenhoefer, T. (2014)Information and Expertise Sharing in Inter-Organizational Crisis Management

    IN Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW), Vol. 23, Pages: 347–387 doi:10.1007/s10606-014-9205-2
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Emergency or crisis management, as is well-attested, is a complex management problem. A variety of agencies need to collaborate and coordinate in real-time and with an urgency that is not always present in other domains. It follows that accurate information of varying kinds (e.g. geographical and weather conditions; available skills and expertises; state-of-play; current dispositions and deployments) needs to be made available in a timely fashion to the organizations and individuals who need it. By definition, this information will come from a number of sources both within and across organizations. Large-scale events in particular necessitate collaboration with other organizations. Of course, plans and processes exist to deal with such events but the number of dynamically changing factors as well as the high number of heterogeneous organizations and the high degree of interdependency involved make it impossible to plan for all contingencies. A degree of ongoing improvisation, which typically occurs by means of a variety of information and expertise sharing practices, therefore becomes necessary. This, however, faces many challenges, such as different organizational cultures, distinct individual and coordinative work practices and discrete information systems. Our work entails an examination of the practices of information and expertise sharing, and the obstacles to it, in inter-organizational crisis management. We conceive of this as a design case study, such that we examine a problem area and its scope; conduct detailed enquiries into practice in that area, and provide design recommendations for implementation and evaluation. First, we will present the results of an empirical study of collaboration practices between organizations and public authorities with security responsibilities such as the police, fire departments, public administration and electricity network operators, mainly in scenarios of medium to large power outages in Germany. Based on these results, we will describe a concept, which was designed, implemented and evaluated as a system prototype, in two iterations. While the first iteration focuses on situation assessment, the second iteration also includes inter-organizational collaboration functionalities. Based on the findings of our evaluations with practitioners, we will discuss how to support collaboration with a particular focus on information and expertise sharing.

    @article{ley_information_2014,
    title = {Information and {Expertise} {Sharing} in {Inter}-{Organizational} {Crisis} {Management}},
    volume = {23},
    url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2014/2014_informationsharingcrisis_jcscw.pdf},
    doi = {10.1007/s10606-014-9205-2},
    abstract = {Emergency or crisis management, as is well-attested, is a complex management problem. A variety of agencies need to collaborate and coordinate in real-time and with an urgency that is not always present in other domains. It follows that accurate information of varying kinds (e.g. geographical and weather conditions; available skills and expertises; state-of-play; current dispositions and deployments) needs to be made available in a timely fashion to the organizations and individuals who need it. By definition, this information will come from a number of sources both within and across organizations. Large-scale events in particular necessitate collaboration with other organizations. Of course, plans and processes exist to deal with such events but the number of dynamically changing factors as well as the high number of heterogeneous organizations and the high degree of interdependency involved make it impossible to plan for all contingencies. A degree of ongoing improvisation, which typically occurs by means of a variety of information and expertise sharing practices, therefore becomes necessary. This, however, faces many challenges, such as different organizational cultures, distinct individual and coordinative work practices and discrete information systems. Our work entails an examination of the practices of information and expertise sharing, and the obstacles to it, in inter-organizational crisis management. We conceive of this as a design case study, such that we examine a problem area and its scope; conduct detailed enquiries into practice in that area, and provide design recommendations for implementation and evaluation. First, we will present the results of an empirical study of collaboration practices between organizations and public authorities with security responsibilities such as the police, fire departments, public administration and electricity network operators, mainly in scenarios of medium to large power outages in Germany. Based on these results, we will describe a concept, which was designed, implemented and evaluated as a system prototype, in two iterations. While the first iteration focuses on situation assessment, the second iteration also includes inter-organizational collaboration functionalities. Based on the findings of our evaluations with practitioners, we will discuss how to support collaboration with a particular focus on information and expertise sharing.},
    number = {4-6},
    journal = {Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing (JCSCW)},
    author = {Ley, Benedikt and Ludwig, Thomas and Pipek, Volkmar and Randall, Dave David and Reuter, Christian and Wiedenhoefer, Torben},
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, Kooperation, InfoStrom, MdK, GI-CSCW-A, Collaboration, Design Case Study, Expertise Sharing, IF 1.1, Information Management, Inter-Organizational Crisis Management, WKWI-B},
    pages = {347--387},
    }

2013


  • Ludwig, T., Reuter, C. & Pipek, V. (2013)What You See Is What I Need: Mobile Reporting Practices in Emergencies

    IN Bertelsen, O. W., Ciolfi, L., Grasso, A. & Papadopoulos, G. A. (Eds.). Paphos, Cyrus, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 181–206 doi:10.1007/978-1-4471-5346-7_10
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Decisions of emergency response organisations (police, fire fighters, infrastructure providers, etc.) rely on accurate and timely information. Some necessary information is integrated into control centre’s IT (weather, availability of electricity, gauge information, etc.), but almost every decision needs to be based on very specific information of the current crisis situation. Due to the unpredictable nature of a crisis, gathering this kind of information requires much improvisation and articulation work which we aim to support. We present a study on how different emergency response organisations communicate with teams on-site to generate necessary information for the coordinating instances, and we described, implemented and evaluated an interaction concept as well as a prototype to support this communication by a semi-structured request-and-report system based on Android devices. We learned that (1) the accuracy of request and reports can be improved by using an appropriate metadata structure in addition to creating multimedia-based information content, (2) requirements of trusted and fast information need to be respected in support concepts although they may even be contradictory, and (3) the coordination strategy of the emergency response organisation also shapes the way this interaction needs to be designed.

    @inproceedings{ludwig_what_2013,
    address = {Paphos, Cyrus},
    title = {What {You} {See} {Is} {What} {I} {Need}: {Mobile} {Reporting} {Practices} in {Emergencies}},
    url = {https://www.wineme.uni-siegen.de/paper/2013/2013_ludwigreuterpipek_wysiwin-morep_ecscw.pdf http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4471-5346-7_10},
    doi = {10.1007/978-1-4471-5346-7_10},
    abstract = {Decisions of emergency response organisations (police, fire fighters, infrastructure providers, etc.) rely on accurate and timely information. Some necessary information is integrated into control centre's IT (weather, availability of electricity, gauge information, etc.), but almost every decision needs to be based on very specific information of the current crisis situation. Due to the unpredictable nature of a crisis, gathering this kind of information requires much improvisation and articulation work which we aim to support. We present a study on how different emergency response organisations communicate with teams on-site to generate necessary information for the coordinating instances, and we described, implemented and evaluated an interaction concept as well as a prototype to support this communication by a semi-structured request-and-report system based on Android devices. We learned that (1) the accuracy of request and reports can be improved by using an appropriate metadata structure in addition to creating multimedia-based information content, (2) requirements of trusted and fast information need to be respected in support concepts although they may even be contradictory, and (3) the coordination strategy of the emergency response organisation also shapes the way this interaction needs to be designed.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the {European} {Conference} on {Computer} {Supported} {Cooperative} {Work} ({ECSCW})},
    publisher = {Springer},
    author = {Ludwig, Thomas and Reuter, Christian and Pipek, Volkmar},
    editor = {Bertelsen, Olav W. and Ciolfi, Luigina and Grasso, Antonietta and Papadopoulos, George Angelos},
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {CSCW, HCI, PRAXLABS, A-Paper, Kooperation, InfoStrom, MdK},
    pages = {181--206},
    }