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Philip Weber

Philip Weber
Email: philip.weber(at)uni-siegen.de

Raum: US-D 116 (Ludwig-Wittgenstein-Haus, Campus Unteres Schloss)

Telefon:  +49 (0) 271 / 740 4283

Sprechstunde: Nach Vereinbarung

Twitter: @PhilipWeber42
Researchgate: Philip Weber

Vita

Philip Weber studierte an der Hochschule Bonn-Rhein-Sieg den Bachelorstudiengang Wirtschaftsinformatik. Nach seinem Abschluss 2016 wechselte er zur Universität Siegen, um dort den Masterstudiengang der Human Computer Interaction zu belegen und 2019 erfolgreich abzuschließen.

Seit April 2019 ist Philip nun wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Doktorand am Lehrstuhl für Cyber-Physische Systeme. Sein aktueller Aufgabenschwerpunkt liegt in der Unterstützung und Umsetzung des EFRE/EU-geförderten Forschungsprojektes Rendezfood. Dort werden soziale, ortsbasierte und spielerische Ansätze eingesetzt, um ein neuartiges Werbekonzept zu entwickeln.

Zu seinen primären Forschungsinteressen zählen die Human-Food Interaction, Conversational Agents und Gamification.

Publikationen

2021


  • Weber, P., Krings, K., Nießner, J., Brodesser, S. & Ludwig, T. (2021)FoodChattAR: Exploring the Design Space of Edible Virtual Agents for Human-Food Interaction

    Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2021. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 638–650 doi:10.1145/3461778.3461998
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    There has been recent criticism from researchers towards simple replication of traditional role models in the design of virtual agents and robots, and a call for new forms of interaction and communication with technology. By exploring the field of Human-Food interaction (HFI) – a sub-area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) which aims to investigate the diversity of ways people interact with food – we therefore specifically examine the design space of edible anthropomorphic virtual agents (EAVAs). To understand human-to-food interactive communication, we conducted an interview study with 19 participants, followed by a co-design workshop on the design of conversational agents for personified food. Based on the results, we implemented a prototype called FoodChattAR that employs augmented reality and chatbots to interact and communicate with food. Our evaluation with 21 participants shows that FoodChattAR turns eating into fun, while at the same time the food conveys relevant societal facts about itself. We contribute to the field of HCI by introducing EAVAs as a novel human-to-food interaction.

    @inproceedings{weber_foodchattar_2021,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{DIS} '21},
    title = {{FoodChattAR}: {Exploring} the {Design} {Space} of {Edible} {Virtual} {Agents} for {Human}-{Food} {Interaction}},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-8476-6},
    shorttitle = {{FoodChattAR}},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3461778.3461998},
    doi = {10.1145/3461778.3461998},
    abstract = {There has been recent criticism from researchers towards simple replication of traditional role models in the design of virtual agents and robots, and a call for new forms of interaction and communication with technology. By exploring the field of Human-Food interaction (HFI) – a sub-area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) which aims to investigate the diversity of ways people interact with food – we therefore specifically examine the design space of edible anthropomorphic virtual agents (EAVAs). To understand human-to-food interactive communication, we conducted an interview study with 19 participants, followed by a co-design workshop on the design of conversational agents for personified food. Based on the results, we implemented a prototype called FoodChattAR that employs augmented reality and chatbots to interact and communicate with food. Our evaluation with 21 participants shows that FoodChattAR turns eating into fun, while at the same time the food conveys relevant societal facts about itself. We contribute to the field of HCI by introducing EAVAs as a novel human-to-food interaction.},
    urldate = {2021-07-05},
    booktitle = {Designing {Interactive} {Systems} {Conference} 2021},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Weber, Philip and Krings, Kevin and Nießner, Julia and Brodesser, Sabrina and Ludwig, Thomas},
    month = jun,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {Human-Food Interaction, rendezfood, Anthropomorphism, Augmented Food, Conversational Agents, Edible Anthropomorphic Virtual Agents, Virtual Agents},
    pages = {638--650},
    file = {Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\JCW56FUW\\Weber et al. - 2021 - FoodChattAR Exploring the Design Space of Edible .pdf:application/pdf},
    }


  • Weber, P., Ludwig, T., Brodessen, S. & Grönewald, L. (2021)“It’s a kind of art!”: Understanding Food Influencers as Influential Content Creators

    CHI ’21: The ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Yokohama, Japan, Publisher: ACM, New York, NY, USA, Pages: 1–14 doi:10.1145/3411764.3445607
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @inproceedings{weber_its_2021,
    address = {Yokohama, Japan},
    title = {"{It}'s a kind of art!": {Understanding} {Food} {Influencers} as {Influential} {Content} {Creators}},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411764.3445607},
    doi = {10.1145/3411764.3445607},
    booktitle = {{CHI} '21: {The} {ACM} {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {ACM, New York, NY, USA},
    author = {Weber, Philip and Ludwig, Thomas and Brodessen, Sabrina and Grönewald, Laura},
    month = may,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {rendezfood, a-paper},
    pages = {1--14},
    }

2020


  • Weber, P., Engelbutzeder, P. & Ludwig, T. (2020)“Always on the Table”: Revealing Smartphone Usages in everyday Eating Out Situations

    Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–13 doi:10.1145/3419249.3420150
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Research on food practices and technology use is becoming more common, albeit with a constant technological determinism with respect to the support of individual practices. Nevertheless, there are only a few empirical studies that outline the use of current technologies within eating contexts. We therefore conducted an empirical study on the practice of eating out and the use of mobile technologies before, during, and after eating. Our investigation consists of a qualitative interview study (n=29) complemented by a large observational study (n=458) within several restaurant settings. Our results indicate a strong reluctance to use technology while eating and highlights several design spaces focusing on before and after the actual eating. Within our paper, we uncover a strong relationship between smartphone use and the social settings in which the interaction takes place. We contribute to the emerging research field of Human-Food Interaction by outlining design spaces for supporting practices around food consumption when eating out.

    @inproceedings{weber_always_2020,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{NordiCHI} '20},
    title = {"{Always} on the {Table}": {Revealing} {Smartphone} {Usages} in everyday {Eating} {Out} {Situations}},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-7579-5},
    shorttitle = {\&\#x201c;{Always} on the {Table}\&\#x201d;},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3419249.3420150},
    doi = {10.1145/3419249.3420150},
    abstract = {Research on food practices and technology use is becoming more common, albeit with a constant technological determinism with respect to the support of individual practices. Nevertheless, there are only a few empirical studies that outline the use of current technologies within eating contexts. We therefore conducted an empirical study on the practice of eating out and the use of mobile technologies before, during, and after eating. Our investigation consists of a qualitative interview study (n=29) complemented by a large observational study (n=458) within several restaurant settings. Our results indicate a strong reluctance to use technology while eating and highlights several design spaces focusing on before and after the actual eating. Within our paper, we uncover a strong relationship between smartphone use and the social settings in which the interaction takes place. We contribute to the emerging research field of Human-Food Interaction by outlining design spaces for supporting practices around food consumption when eating out.},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the 11th {Nordic} {Conference} on {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction}: {Shaping} {Experiences}, {Shaping} {Society}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Weber, Philip and Engelbutzeder, Philip and Ludwig, Thomas},
    month = oct,
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {Eating Out, Empirical Study, Human-Food Interaction, Smartphone Usage, rendezfood},
    pages = {1--13},
    file = {Full Text PDF:C\:\\Users\\Nathanael Klein\\Zotero\\storage\\5JBTQMGP\\Weber et al. - 2020 - “\;Always on the Table”\; Revealing Sma.pdf:application/pdf},
    }


  • Weber, P. & Ludwig, T. (2020)(Non-)Interacting with conversational agents: perceptions and motivations of using chatbots and voice assistants

    MuC ’20: Proceedings of the Conference on Mensch und Computer. Magdeburg doi:10.1145/3404983.3405513
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]

    @inproceedings{weber_non-interacting_2020,
    address = {Magdeburg},
    title = {({Non}-){Interacting} with conversational agents: perceptions and motivations of using chatbots and voice assistants},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3404983.3405513},
    doi = {10.1145/3404983.3405513},
    booktitle = {{MuC} '20: {Proceedings} of the {Conference} on {Mensch} und {Computer}},
    author = {Weber, Philip and Ludwig, Thomas},
    month = sep,
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {rendezfood},
    }